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Avakaya / Andhra Mango pickle

Avakaya

With summer, Mangoes are back in season. There is not much to like about summer except mangoes. We all love summer only for mangoes, isn’t it? When raw mangoes are in season, it is must for us to make pickle so that we can relish these throughout the year.

 
Avakaya
Last year I prepared 4 types of mango pickle like mango chunda, Rajasthani mango pickle, Punjabi mango pickle and Avakaya. My father-in-law liked Avakaya a lot. It has become a compulsory item for his lunch plate. So this year I decided to make the pickle again.

 
Avakaya

After coming to Salem I got an opportunity to be a neighbor of an adorable Andhra girl, who usually shares their traditional snacks, Gangura pickle, Tamarind rice and Avakaya pickle with us. After having her pickle I feel they use some special chili powder in their pickle, because the pickle was very very spicy. She told they always use Guntur chili powder and ground nut oil in their pickle. I found Guntur chili powder is really very hot .

 
Avakaya
Andhra cuisine is popularly known for its hot and spicy foods. Though I don’t like too much spicy but pickle is an exception. I use normal packet chili powder (Aachi Brand) but you can use any other brand that is available to you. Even if you want your pickle to be very spicy you can use any variety of spicy chili powder.

 
Avakaya
Selecting mangoes are very important in this pickle as the pickle is going to last for a year & so. So choose a mature and round variety of mango which is known as pickle mangoes. I found some white chickpeas from my neighbor’s pickle but here I am adding garlic pods to give it a traditional touch.

 

 

 

Print Recipe
Avakaya / Andhra Mango pickle
Andhra style mango pickle
Cuisine south indian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
zar
Ingredients
Cuisine south indian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
zar
Ingredients
Andhra style mango pickle
Instructions
  1. Wash and wipe the mangoes well. Wipe for 2-3 times to ensure that no moisture left on the mangoes.
  2. Cut the mangoes into 1-1.5” pieces with the inner shell intact. Also wipe each and every piece of mango after cutting so that no fungus left on the pieces. Spread the pieces in a clean dry cloth for 10-15 minutes.
  3. Peel the garlic and wipe them well. Take mustard seed and grind them into fine powder. Take the crystal salt and grind it into fine powder.
  4. Take a big bowl mix the dry spices (chili powder, salt, mustard powder, methi seed powder and haldi) till they combine well. Add mango pieces & garlic pods, mix all the ingredients with hand .
  5. Finally add oil (I used mustard oil) and give a good mix. Pour this prepared pickle into a clean sterilize glass bottle, pour rest of oil above the pickle.
  6. Cover the glass bottle mouth with a clean white muslin cloth and tie with a thread. Cover the jar with a lid and rest it for 4 days.
  7. After 4 days the oil should be ½” above the mango pieces, if not then add more oil. Mix the pickle with a dry spoon and check the salt.
  8. In this step you can grind and add more salt, if required. Cover the jar again with that thin muslin cloth and keep direct under sunlight for 15 days.
  9. After 15 days your pickle will be ready to release with Rice or paratha.
Recipe Notes
  • Take good mature Mangoes and never go for tender mangoes.
  • Instead of garlic white/black chickpeas can be used.
  • We usually sundry the pickle for a month or so, as we are habituated from our childhood.
  • May be because Andhra people use groundnut oil/ sesame oil in their pickle they sundry the pickle for a day or two.
  • Here I used mustard oil so I sundry the pickle for 15 days.
  • Always use clean spoon to serve pickle as water and pickle are enemies.
  • There should be enough oil so that pickle could last long.
  • After 4 days I have added 2 tbsp more crystal salt powder in the pickle.
  • Salt act as a good preservative and there  should be a balance taste of salt in the pickle

shibani

Cooking is my passion.i love to play with myriad tastes of spices . I belong to a odiya family by birth but marriade to a bengoli person.the crash of cultures between two families induced me to cook innovatively so as to make everyone happy.

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